Tag Archives: losing weight

Fewer Americans Try to Lose Weight

More US adults are overweight or obese, but a lot of Americans have just given up on trying to lose those extra pounds, a new study reveals.

Fewer Americans Are Trying to Lose Weight

Fewer Americans are trying to lose weight, study says. Photo by Stoner Days

One in every three Americans are overweight, compared with one in five 2 decades ago, researchers report. It seems that adults were more interested in weight loss years ago but now have lost interest somehow.

People who were observed between 2009 and 2014 were 17 percent less likely overall to say they had tried to lose weight during the previous year than those observed between 1988 and 1994, the study discovered.

Individuals who were overweight but not quite obese have went through the greatest loss of interest in maintaining a healthy weight, said senior researcher Dr. Jian Zhang.

“This is not good. We are missing the opportunity to stop overweight from becoming obesity,” said Zhang, who is an associate professor of epidemiology with Georgia Southern University. You can start to see even the younger generation become overweight which is another problem we are facing.

Zhang and his colleagues studied data from the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, a federally funded ongoing survey that keeps track of Americans’ health and diet habits.

All ethnic and racial groups across both genders reported decreased interest in losing weight, but women in particular were more likely to say they had given up on it, the findings showed.

By 2014, black women were 31 percent less likely to have tried weight loss compared with 20 years prior, and white women were 27 percent less likely to have made the attempt, the researchers found.

People might be giving up on weight loss because it’s just too difficult, Zhang said.

“It’s painful,” he explained. “It’s hard to drop pounds. Many of us tried and failed, tried and failed, and finally failed to try anymore.” Finding a diet and exercise plan that is easy to follow is difficult and staying dedicated is another issue that we go through.

Modern medicine has also improved on preserving the overall health of individuals, perhaps causing them to ask why they should bother, Zhang said. Everyday there seems to be some sort of a new pill that will improve your health or increase your life expectancy.

Many might not take weight loss seriously because evidence shows that adults overweight may live as long or even longer than normal-weight adults. Since more than half are overweight, we may think we are okay, and it is not necessary to change our body weight.

Dr. Mitchell Roslin, chief of obesity surgery for Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City, mentioned that conflicting diet advice also probably dissuades many from trying to shed some pounds.

“First they were told don’t eat fat, and now we are telling patients to reduce simple carbohydrates,” Roslin said. “While I believe that reducing carbohydrates is key, what the public hears is, ‘I might as well eat what I like because all this advice has not worked.'”

I believe doctors, public health officials and the media should do a better job at binging awareness to living healthy. The ups and downs of losing weight is frustrating and the health risks of being overweight should be emphasized with better education.

Zhang said that future efforts to improve public health should focus on lifestyle changes that promote healthy eating and exercise for everyone, rather than an emphasis on losing weight.

I agree that prevention is the better way to tackle overweight and obesity, so further efforts should focus on just that to get Americans back interested in weight loss.

Source: Jian Zhang, M.D., DrPH, associate professor,  epidemiology, Georgia Southern University, Statesboro, Ga.; Mitchell Roslin, M.D., chief, obesity surgery, Lenox Hill Hospital, New York City; Rajpal Chopra, M.D., endocrinologist, Northwell Health’s Long Island Jewish Forest Hills, Forest Hills, N.Y.; March 7, 2017, Journal of the American Medical Association

Leeman Taylor
Bachelor Degree in Criminal Justice
Real Estate Investor & Internet Marketer

Weight Loss Linked to Lower Risk of Uterine Cancer

Weight loss may lower the risk of cancer of the endometrium, the lining of the uterus, in older women, a new study suggests.

Weight Loss May Reduce Uterine Cancer

Weight loss may lower the risk of uterine cancer in older women, a new study finds. Photo by Miami OBGYN

This is good news to older adults who think that weight loss may not be beneficial to them. “Many older adults think it’s too late to benefit from weight loss, or think that because they are overweight or obese, the damage has already been done. But our findings show that’s not true,” study author Juhua Luo said in a news release from the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO).

These new findings shed light on the fact that it can never be to too late to lose weight, no matter what age you are. “It’s never too late, and even moderate weight loss can make a big difference when it comes to cancer risk,” Luo added. She’s an associate professor of epidemiology and biostatistics at Indiana University Bloomington’s School of Public Health.

According to the researchers, endometrial cancer is the most common gynecologic cancer and the fourth most common cancer among women in the United States, the researchers said. More than 75 percent of endometrial cancers occur in women aged 55 and older.

The researchers analyzed data from more than 35,000 American women between the ages of 50 and 79. The study included an average of more than 10 years of follow-up.

Although the study did not prove cause and effect, losing weight was associated with a significantly lower risk of endometrial cancer, and that benefit was greatest in obese women, the researchers said. Exercising alone just makes you feel so good and the fact that it can lower the risk of cancer just makes it all the better.

Women over 50 who reduced 5 percent or more of their body weight had a 29 percent lower risk of endometrial cancer, regardless of their age or how much weight they lost, according to the researchers.

Obese women who reduced 5 percent or more of their body weight had a 56 percent reduction in their risk. Overweight or obese women who accomplished a normal body mass index (BMI — an estimate of body fat based on weight and height) had the same risk as women who kept a normal BMI, the study authors said.

The researchers also discovered that women who gained more than 10 pounds had a 26 percent increased risk of endometrial cancer.

The study was published online Feb. 6 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

“There have been more than a thousand studies linking obesity to an increased risk of endometrial and other cancers, but almost none that look at the relationship between weight loss and cancer risk,” said Dr. Jennifer Ligibel, an ASCO expert in cancer prevention.

“This study tells us that weight loss, even later in life, is linked to a lower risk of endometrial cancer. The findings also support the development of weight loss programs as part of a cancer prevention strategy in overweight and obese adults,” she said.
Source: Journal of Clinical Oncology, news release, Feb. 6, 2017

Leeman Taylor
Bachelor Degree in Criminal Justice
Real Estate Investor & Internet Marketer

Small Weight Loss Has Big Health Benefits

Obese people who lose just 5 percent of their body weight can reduce the risk of heart disease and Type 2 diabetes and increase their metabolic function, says a new study.

Small Weight Loss

Losing 5 percent of your body weight has reasonable health benefits, study says. Photo by New Pittsburgh Courier

There are many current treatment guidelines that recommend patients lose about 5 to 10 percent of their body weight in order to receive health benefits, but the recommendations were focused on prior studies that did not differentiate between individuals who lost only 5 percent of their body weight and those who lost more weight.

In this study, 40 obese individuals with signs of insulin resistance were randomized to either go on a low calorie diet to lose 5, 10 or 15 percent of their body weight or just maintain their body weight. According to the journal Cell Metabolism, the study found that 5 percent weight loss was enough to lower multiple risk factors for heart disease and type 2 diabetes. To put this in perspective, a 200-pound individual could lose just 10 pounds to improve their health profile. This is more encouraging in my opinion because it’s a realistic goal and it is much easier to achieve than losing 10 percent of that 200 pounds.

“Even though five percent weight loss may not have dramatic cosmetic benefits, it does have significant health benefits,” said the study’s author, Dr. Samuel Klein, director of the Center for Human Nutrition at Washington University School of Medicine. “You’re much healthier on the inside, and it’s a really reasonable and legitimate target for people with obesity.”

This study should be a reminder to obese people that a 5 percent weight loss is really a success and not a failure. Diet and exercise can be difficult for any individual overweight and when you do not see any immediate physical changes, you may feel discouraged. This study is a good example to remind you that you are actually fighting diseases and improving your overall health by losing a little weight.

Obesity is a major risk factor for chronic health conditions, such as diabetes, cancer and heart disease. Taking short walks and making small changes to your diet is a good way to start weight loss to improve your health today.

“Our findings show that even a small amount of weight loss has important health benefits for multiple organ systems,” Klein said. “We hope that these findings will encourage obese people to take reasonable steps to watch what they eat and increase their physical activity, because this will translate into a lower risk for diabetes and heart disease.”

To say the least, some weight loss is better than no weight loss at all or even making an honest effort. Just because you don’t see instant physical results it does not mean you are not becoming healthier inside. Losing just 5 percent of your body weight is really a success so this should be encouragement to keep losing weight and receiving the nice health benefits that come along with it.

Leeman Taylor
Bachelor Degree in Criminal Justice
Real Estate Investor & Internet Marketer

Source: Magkos, Faidon et al. “Effects of Moderate and Subsequent Progressive Weight Loss on Metabolic Function and Adipose Tissue Biology in Humans with Obesity” Cell Metabolism 22 February 2016

Melissa McCarthy Shows off 50 Pound Weight Loss at SXSW

Melissa McCarthy, the ‘Bridesmaids’ star, looked amazing after her 50 pound weight loss on the red carpet at South By Southwest (SXSW) this past Sunday. The 44-year old actor had been losing weight for months now and she finally has a chance to outshine co-stars like Jason Statham and Jude Law (Brow 2015).

Melissa McCarthy Weight Loss

Melissa McCarthy shows off 50 pound weight loss at SXSW. (Photo Credit: Getty [2])

Melissa’s fifty pound weight loss apparently became the talk of the festival as she looked stunning at the Austin film extravaganza. Finding your own weight loss routine is important and Melissa credited diet and exercise for her weight loss, telling Good Housekeeping that she is an avid tennis player and committed to her Pilates routine. But she also said she’s “weirdly healthy’ when it comes to food. I love boxing and running so that’s how I stay fit it’s something I enjoy doing at the same time.

I am very happy for Melissa for her weight loss and upcoming movie ‘Ghostbusters’, which is set to hit theaters soon. I think she is a very funny actor and a person with a great heart as well who is outgoing.  For the most part, losing weight involves finding a diet and exercise plan that works for you and sticking to it, but make the weight loss fun at the same time like Melissa.

Leeman Taylor
Senior Criminal Justice Major at Florida A&M University
Real Estate Investor. Internet Marketer.

Source: Brow, J. “Melissa McCarthy Drops over Fifty Pounds –Stuns at SXSW” 16 March 2015 Hollywood Life