Tag Archives: suppress appetite

Freezing the ‘Hunger Nerve’ May Help Weight Loss

A new weight loss study being conducted by doctors uses gas to freeze a nerve in the back that sends hunger signals to the brain, reducing the patient’s appetite and aiding weight loss.

Hunger Nerve

According to a new study, freezing the hunger nerve may promote weight loss. Photo by News Health

This study was presented at the Society of Interventional Radiology’s 2018 Annual Scientific Meeting, that included ten people with obesity and a body mass index (BMI) between 30 and 37.

“We developed this treatment for patients with mild-to-moderate obesity to reduce the attrition that is common with weight-loss efforts,” said Dr. David Prologo, the study’s lead author and an interventional radiologist at Emory University School of Medicine. “We are trying to help people succeed with their own attempts to lose weight.”

During the study, women and men were put under sedation while doctors inserted a needle into their backs controlled by a CT scan. The needle was guided to the posterior vagal trunk, then the needle and surrounding nerve was froze. The procedure corrupts part of the nerve connected to the brain and stops the connection between the two. The process is painless and only takes 30 minutes.

All of the patients reported a decrease in appetite. The average weight loss was 3.6 percent after 90 days and the average loss of excess BMI was 14 percent.

Many weight loss programs fail because they are hard to follow and people just have trouble controlling their appetite. With this nerve-freezing study, the hunger signal to the brain can be weakened, providing a solution to mild obesity.

This is not a permanent procedure, however. The nerve will fully grow back in one year and to follow up on this study, more subjects will have to be tested in a clinical trial

Source: Lardieri, A. “New Weight Loss Procedure Freezes Hunger Nerves to Brain” 21 March 2018 www.usnews.com

Leeman Taylor
B.S. Criminal Justice

Beans, Chickpeas May Aid Weight Loss

Beans, peas, lentils and chickpeas may be great for weight loss, according to a new Canadian research study.

Beans, Chickpeas Aid Weight Loss

Beans, chickpeas or also known as “pulses”, help you feel full to lose weight. Photo by the Globe and Mail

Data from 21 clinical trials that was analyzed on foods known as “pulses”, found that they can help people on a diet feel full and lose unhealthy weight. Beans, peas and other legumes are some of my favorite foods in my diet so this is good news for me as well. I could eat beans almost every day with rice and not get tired of it. Consuming these pulses on a regular basis means I am maintaining my weight while eating something I enjoy at the same time.

“Though the weight loss was small, our findings suggest that simply including pulses in your diet may help you lose weight, and we think more importantly, prevent you from gaining it back after you lose it,” study lead author Russell de Souza, a researcher at St. Michael’s Hospital in Toronto, said during a hospital news release.

These foods are high in fiber, protein, vitamins and minerals so there is no question how they help you lose weight or lower cholesterol levels if consumed regularly.

The new analysis in the trial included a total of 940 adults who began eating one serving (3/4) cup of pulses each day. They lost 0.75 pounds on average over a six week period without making any extra effort to stay away from other kinds of foods, said researchers. This may not seem like a lot of weight loss but the fact that pulses suppress appetite is the main point. When you feel full, you eat less. The Canadian team also noted that pulses have a “low glycemic index” — meaning that they break down slowly in the digestive tract.

Prior research has found that one serving of legumes makes individuals feel fuller. Each time I eat a few good servings of beans or peas I always have a low appetite and feel less hungry later.

“This new study fits well with our previous work, which found that pulses increased the feeling of fullness by 31 percent, which may indeed result in less food intake,” Russell de Souza, the study’s lead author and researcher with the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute of St. Michael’s Hospital, said in a statement.

I love the fact of adding foods to your diet instead of removing them to lose weight and most diets fail according to research. It excites me even more that eating beans and peas has been shown to lower bad cholesterol while lowering the risk of heart disease at the same time.

To say the least, if you love beans, chickpeas or other legumes like I do, you should eat them more often to lose weight and improve your health for the future.

Leeman Taylor
Bachelor Degree in Criminal Justice
Real Estate Investor & Internet Marketer

Source: Souza et al. “Effects of dietary pulse consumption on body weight: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials” Am J Clin Nutr ajcn124677First published online March 30, 2016.doi:10.3945/ajcn.115.124677

Some Diabetes Drugs May Help Weight Loss

A class of drugs that are used to treat diabetes seems to help individuals lose weight by altering how the brain reacts to food, according to a new study.

Diabetes Drugs May Help Weight Loss

Some Diabetes Drugs May Help Weight Loss. Photo by PreDiabetes Centers

Researchers have been trying to figure out how gut-hormone based medications known as GLP-1 receptor agonists also help individuals with type 2 diabetes lose extra pounds (HealthDay 2015 ).

A Dutch team stated that the drugs may reduce cravings and increase satisfaction while eating. This is good news for many people seeking weight loss but having trouble suppressing their appetite. The researchers looked specifically at the injectable GLP-1 receptor agonist exenatide.

Their discovery will be demonstrated at the American Diabetes Associations (ADA) yearly meeting in Boston on Tuesday. Studies that are presented at meetings are usually viewed as preliminary until they have been published in a peer-viewed journal. With that being said, we cannot jump to any conclusions just yet.

“When you eat, there are several hormones released. GLP-1 is one of them, “Dr. Liselotte van Bloemendaal, a Ph.D. student at the Diabetes Center, VU University Medical Center in Amsterdam, Holland, mentioned in an ADA news release.

“These hormones relay information to the center of the nervous system about nutritional status to regulate appetite. Using working MRI’s (which calculate brain activity by detecting changes in blood flow), we looked at the reward centers in the brains of obese individuals with and without type 2 diabetes and measured the response to the anticipation of and drinking of chocolate milk while being given GLP-1 receptor agonist intravenously versus placebo,” she explained.

When given the drug, the brain did not anticipate the food reward as much. The researchers said this could lead to reduced cravings (HealthDay 2015). The drug also seemed to increase the feeling of reward from food while people were eating, which might reduce overeating, according to van Bloemendaal. I understand that overeating is a major issue for people trying to lose weight and this GLP-1 receptor might be the perfect fat loss tool.

The findings may lead to new treatments for obesity, she said. Van Bloemendaal also wants to determine whether these drugs can reduce cravings for drugs, alcohol and nicotine. If so, people may be able to quit smoking and lose weight at the same time.

Leeman Taylor
Bachelor’s Degree in Criminal Justice
Real Estate Investor & Internet Marketer

Source: Preidt, R. “Certain Diabetes Drugs May Aid Weight Loss by Curbing Cravings” www.healthday.com June 9, 2015