Tag Archives: weight loss surgery

Weight-Loss Surgery Linked to Lasting Gastro Issues

Although weight-loss surgery can help obese people reduce extra pounds, a new study says the procedure may also cause long-lasting stomach issues for a lot of patients.

Gastric Bypass

A Dutch research study found that individuals who underwent the most common type of weight-loss surgery – known as laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass – suffered gastrointestinal issues and food intolerance up to two years after the surgery. Photo by Lourdes.com

A Dutch research study found that individuals who underwent the most common type of weight-loss surgery – known as laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass – suffered gastrointestinal issues and food intolerance up to two years after the surgery.

The procedure involves stapling the tummy and re-routing the intestines, so what is consumed bypasses the majority of the stomach and caloric consumption is decreased.

However, these issues are not likely to be restricted to this type of weight-loss surgery alone, said study author Dr. Thomas Boerlage. He is a researcher in the department of internal medicine at MC Slotervaart, in Amsterdam, in the Netherlands.

“I would very much expect other bariatric [weight-loss] procedures to [cause] gastrointestinal complaints, too,” Boerlage cautioned. He said that gastric banding, along with newer types of weight-loss options, are “fairly certain” to spark long-term gastrointestinal complications. This gives me reason to believe that any procedure that deals with the stomach will most certainly cause lasting gastro issues.

Boerlage also mentioned that “it was already known from previous studies that patients can develop gastrointestinal complaints after a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. However, most of those studies concerned only the first year after surgery, and you can imagine that people might have complaints shortly after surgery, whatever kind of surgery it is.”

To exam the risk of long-term gastrointestinal issues, Boerlage’s team focused on the experience of almost 250 patients who had the surgery in 2012. They all completed a food tolerance and gastrointestinal survey two years after having the operation. The patients’ answers were compared to 295 obese patients who did not have the procedure.

For the most part, the weight-loss surgery patients were found to be battling with significantly more gastrointestinal problems at the two-year mark that those who had not undergone the operation, the investigators found.

For instance, surgery patients were found to be struggling with more indigestion, abdominal pain, diarrhea and constipation, compared with the non-surgical group. Surgery patients did, however report lesser levels of both acid regurgitation and hunger pain, compared with non-surgical patients. This is a surprise to me because usually patients who undergo surgery would seem to have higher levels of hunger pains and acid problems than non-surgical patients.

In relation to food intolerance, 70 percent of surgery patients said they experienced some form of intolerance to an average of four different foods, and more than 90 percent said the problem emerged only after the procedure.

According to the report, problematic foods included red meats and items that contained high amounts of fat or sugar, such as cakes, pies, sodas, fried foods and pastries

With that being said, only about 14 percent of those having ongoing lasting food intolerance said the problem bothered them “much” or “very much”

However, less than 17 percent of the non-surgical group reported experiencing any comparable form of eating issue.

These findings were reported in the December issue of British Journal of Surgery.

So what can bypass patients do?

“In general, it is advisable for patients to stick tightly to the dietary guidelines that are given after surgery,” said Boerlage. “This will surely help to alleviate symptoms, although not all symptoms can be prevented,” he added.

“We do advise our patients to avoid certain foods with a high sugar or fat content. And, indeed, these are the types of food that are a problem in obese patients in the first place. So, in a way you could say that these complaints are also useful because they remind patients to avoid certain foods,” Boerlage suggested.

I agree with Boerlage and the problem can be easily fixed if patients stick to the recommended dietary guidelines. I believe weight-loss surgery is a lifesaver for many and the benefits clearly outweigh any dietary issues.

Source: Thomas Boerlage, M.D., doctoral candidate, resident and researcher, department of internal medicine, MC Slotervaart, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Dec. 19, 2016, British Journal of Surgery

Leeman Taylor
Bachelor Degree in Criminal Justice
Real Estate Investor & Internet Marketer

Weight-Loss Surgery May Boost Survival

Weight loss surgery may greatly reduce obese people’s risk of premature death, a new study says.

Gastric Bypass Weight Loss Surgery

Weight loss surgery may boost survival for obese, says study. Photo by Healthy Hippie

Nearly five years after surgery, the death rate was over one percent for the individuals who had weight loss surgery and four percent for those in the non-surgical group, according to researchers.

The study was led by Christina Persson from the University of Gothenburg in Sweden, who analyzed data from almost 49,000 obese people in Sweden. They were between 18 and 74 years of age.

Over 22,000 people had weight-loss surgery between 2000 and 2011. About 93 percent of the people in the surgery group had the procedure known as gastric bypass. The study compared them with approximately 26,000 people who did not have surgery.

According to the research, the overall death rate was reduced by 57 percent in the surgery group, compared to the non-surgery group. This number remained consistent after researchers adjusted for age and other previous diseases such as diabetes, cancer and heart disease.

Heart disease, cancer, suicide and accidents were the most common causes of death among those who did not have the surgery.

Cancer and heart disease accounted for most of the major difference in mortality rates between obese people who underwent weight-loss surgery and those who did not, says researchers.

Losing weight is not easy for anyone overweight so undergoing weight loss surgery should be recommended by doctors or health care providers. A death rate that is decreased by about 60 percent is amazing and I believe more obese people should consider having gastric bypass surgery to increase his or her survival.

According to the CDC, over one-third of adults in the U.S. are obese, so this is a very serious issue. There is no overnight success or magic pill that will make you lose weight so it really does take hard work and dedication.

The study was set to be presented Thursday at the European Obesity Summit. Findings presented at meetings are usually viewed as preliminary until they have been published in peer-reviewed journals.

Leeman Taylor
Bachelor Degree in Criminal Justice
Real Estate Investor & Internet Marketer
Source: European Obesity Summit, news release, June 2, 2016

Side Effects from This Weight Loss Method

Although the majority of individuals who have a type of weight loss surgery say their overall health has gotten better, a large number of side effects and visits to the hospital are reported as well, says a new study.

Weight Loss Surgery

Side effects from one weight loss surgery include stomach pain and fatigue, says study authors. Photo by Massey Medical

Gastric bypass is a surgery that helps you lose weight by altering the way your stomach and small intestines handle food according the U.S. National Library of Medicine. Your stomach will be smaller after surgery and you will feel full with less food. You still have to eat right and be physical after surgery to stay healthy and keep the weight off so keep that in mind.

Over 1,400 individuals completed surveys who underwent gastric bypass surgery in Denmark between the years of 2006 and 2011. It showed that only 7 percent revealed decreased health after they underwent the surgery but a shocking 89 percent experienced side effects. About 5 years after surgery, side effects such as fatigue and stomach pain were reported while 29 percent were hospitalized.

About 70 percent of the patients sought medical care for their problems and the most common rationale for seeking medical attention was fatigue (34 percent), abdominal pain (34 percent), anemia (28 percent), and gallstones (16 percent), say authors.

Women, those under the age of 35, smokers and the unemployed were those most likely to have side effects after surgery. Patients who also had the most symptoms had an overall lower quality of life which could lead to depression.

Health care providers should focus on quality of life between patients who are having several symptoms to help them prevent depression. “Focus on the [quality of life] among patients with many symptoms may be required since such patients are at risk of depression. Development of new weight-loss treatments with less risk of subsequent symptoms should be a high priority,” study leader Dr. Sigrid Bjerge Gribsholt, from Aarhus University Hospital in Denmark, and colleagues wrote.

There are already new alternatives to weight loss surgery being developed such as the balloon pill and other devices that aid fat loss. Technology is always advancing so there will be more developments to come to help individuals lose weight fast.

Weight loss can be difficult for anyone especially if you are morbidly obese so gastric bypass surgery may be a better option for you. Diet and exercise is most important so consulting with your physician about a plan to lose weight should be a priority.

If your New Year’s Resolution is to lose weight and stay fit, talk with your doctor today about a weight loss plan that is right for you.

Leeman Taylor
Bachelor Degree in Criminal Justice
Real Estate Investor & Internet Marketer

Source: Gribsholt SB, Pedersen AM, Svensson E, Thomsen RW, Richelsen B. Prevalence of Self-reported Symptoms After Gastric Bypass Surgery for Obesity. JAMA Surg. 2016.

Weight Loss Surgery Will Fight Type 2 Diabetes

Research has showed that weight loss surgery may eliminate type-2 diabetes in patients, and a new study discovers that the surgery may be long term. According to the diabetes, bariatric surgery is more effective than standard treatment for the short-term control of type-2 diabetes.

Gastric Bypass Weight Loss Surgery

Weight loss surgery is better than medications for fighting type-2 diabetes, according to study. Photo by Healthy Hippie

“This is a very important study because it’s the first randomized trial comparing diabetes to medical treatment of diabetes with five years of follow-up,” said Dr. Philip Schauer, who directs the Bariatric and Metabolic Institute at the Cleveland Clinic.

The study led by Dr. Francesco Rubino of King’s College London tracked 5-year outcomes of 60 obese patients who had type 2 diabetes. The patients were chosen at random to undergo either one of two weight loss surgery, or continue with traditional drug therapy to help manage their diabetes.

The results discovered that 50% of the 38 weight-loss surgery patients kept diabetes from reoccurring, compared to none of the 15 patients who were in the drug treatment group. It seems that bariatric surgery is a much better choice for fat loss and disease control than treatment programs in this case.

The researchers added that patients who had surgery also had lower blood sugar levels than those treated with drugs, despite of whether their diabetes went into full remission. “What really is causing the remission of diabetes after surgery remains unknown,” Dr. Rubino said. What is known, he added, is that the intestines produce a host of hormones involved in regulating metabolism. Reconstructing the gastrointestinal tract so that food bypasses the stomach and small intestine may help restore normal metabolic control, he explained.

Gastric bypass or biliopancreatic diversion was the only methods of weight loss surgery that was used during the trial and they both had their weaknesses. Patients who got gastric bypass had lesser nutritional side effects with a better quality of life overall while more people witnessed their diabetes go into remission with biliopancreatic diversion. With that being said, gastric bypass is probably the better choice for fighting type-2 diabetes.

Although this was a small trial, it seems that surgery is quite stable in the long run, at least for five years. The procedure seems to be safe with fairly low complication rates. The downside is that any weight loss surgery can be expensive and comes with risks. Insurance companies do not seem to favor covering costs for weight loss surgery and rather save money with medications. With this study, I believe insurance companies may reconsider and pay for more patients to have weight loss surgery to fight type-2 diabetes.

Leeman Taylor
Bachelor Degree in Criminal Justice
Real Estate Investor & Internet Marketer

Source: Mingrone, Geltrude et al.” Bariatric–metabolic surgery versus conventional medical treatment in obese patients with type 2 diabetes: 5 year follow-up of an open-label, single-centre, randomised controlled trial” The Lancet, Volume 386 , Issue 9997 , 964 – 973 August 2015

Weight Loss Surgery Benefits May Diminish Over Time

Weight-loss surgeries for obesity are very popular, often producing dramatic fat loss and reducing type-2 diabetes, according a new study. The problem is that patients regain weight and health problems return in the long run.

Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy

Weight loss surgery benefits for obesity fade over time, according to new study. Photo by Daryl S. Marx M.D.

Diet and exercise are essential for any long term weight loss from my experience but I understand this is very difficult for anyone who is already obese.

A new study published in JAMA Surgery reviewed patients’ files between one and five years who underwent laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG). It discovered that patients who had that kind of surgery encountered significant weight gain and a return of type 2 diabetes years later.

A sleeve gastrectomy is basically the removal of part of the stomach and creating a long, slim sleeve, or pouch, from the remaining section of the stomach, according to the U.S. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disease (NIDDK). When the size of the stomach is reduced it limits the amount of food you can consume. Also, it suppresses appetite, lowers blood sugar and changes gut hormones.

“Weight-loss surgery is not a panacea for weight loss over the long run,” said lead researcher Dr. Andrei Keidar, of the Beilinson Hospital in Petah Tikva, Israel.

Keidar says the main reason for weight regain is that the stomach dilates, which means you can eat more. The appetite returns so individuals can consume more and they desire to eat more (JAMA Surg.).

Data was collected on nearly 450 patients between April 2006 and February 2013. However, only 39 patients had a full follow-up by the fifth year after surgery. It seems patients either were ashamed or just became discouraged and did not want to report which could have ended in a biased study.

Patients lost 77 percent of their excess weight in the first year of surgery. Shockingly, they regained weight by the fifth year, resulting in only a 56 percent fat loss. Also, 51 percent of people eliminated type 2 diabetes in the first year. In the fifth year, only 20 percent were still clear of the disease, said researchers (JAMA Surg.).

I agree with Keidar that weight loss surgery is a “behavioral surgery”. If you do not switch up your lifestyle you will regain weight.

Even though patients may regain weight and develop diabetes again, I still believe weight-loss surgery is the best option for obese patients.

Leeman Taylor
Bachelor Degree in Criminal Justice
Real Estate Investor & Internet Marketer

Source: Golomb I, Ben David M, Glass A, Kolitz T, Keidar A. “Long-term Metabolic Effects of Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy” JAMA Surg. Published online August 05, 2015. doi:10.1001/jamasurg.2015.2202.

FDA Approves Weight Loss Balloon

Obese people seeking to lose weight now have a new option: a weight loss balloon that has been recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). With more than a third of the U.S. population overweight or obese, this new device will be a very powerful tool for fat loss in my opinion.

ReShape Weight Loss Balloon

FDA approves new weight loss balloon to help patients lose weight by making them feel full. WebMD photo

The ReShape Dual Balloon is inserted through the mouth, into the stomach, and inflated with a sterile solution. The procedure only takes about 30 thirty minutes while the patient is mildly sedated.  It fills the space in the stomach to give you a feeling of fullness and it can be left there for up to six months (FDA). I believe this will be a better solution for patients who want to lose weight in a non-surgical manner instead of going through LAP band or gastric bypass surgery.

The approval of this weight loss device was based on a study of 326 obese individuals, with ages between 22 and 60, who had at least one obesity-related health issue. There were 187 people who lost an average of 14.3 pounds by the time the device was removed. Members who did not receive the weight loss balloon only lost 7.3 pounds on average. Six months later, patients who lost the initial 14.3 pounds kept about 10 pounds of that weight off (FDA). This is good news for those individuals who struggle with weight management after one year of reaching their fat loss goals.

“For those with obesity, significant weight loss and maintenance of that weight loss often requires a combination of solutions including efforts to improve diet and exercise habits,” said William Maisel, M.D., M.P.H., acting director of the Office of Device Evaluation at the FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health. “This new balloon device provides doctors and patients with a new non-surgical option that can be quickly implanted, is non-permanent, and can be easily removed.”

I personally love natural weight loss which is physical activity and healthy eating. This was also recommended for patients who wish to keep the lost weight off after the balloon was removed according to the FDA press release. With this new weight loss balloon, patients have another option to fight obesity but like any other procedure, it comes with its side effects.

Some of the complications included discomfort during the procedure, rare cases of allergic reaction, infection and breathing difficulties, heart attack and esophageal tear, says the FDA. Also, patients may experience vomiting, abdominal pain, nausea, feelings of indigestion and gastric ulcers, adds the FDA.

I believe this new fat loss balloon by ReShape Medical Inc. is what obese or overweight people really need to help them lose weight and keep it off for good.

Leeman Taylor
Bachelor Degree in Criminal Justice
Real Estate Investor & Internet Marketer

Source: www.fda.gov “FDA approves non-surgical temporary balloon device to treat obesity” 28 July 2015 U.S. Food and Drug Administration

Weight Loss Surgery Can Reduce Death 5-10 Years After Procedure

Weight loss surgery has always been suggested to improve survival among severely obese patients. According to new research published in the Journal of American Medical Association (JAMA), bariatric surgery reduced mortality 5 to 10 years after Veterans had surgery (Afterburn et al. 2015).

Gastric Bypass for Weight Loss

Bariatric or weight loss surgery has been shown to help Veterans live longer after 5 to 10 years. Clipart Photo

In the study, 2,500 patients underwent bariatric surgery in Veterans Affairs (VA) bariatric centers from 2000-2011 and matched them to 7,462 control patients using sequential stratification. The average age for the patients was 52 with a body mass index (BMI) of 47. The patients either had gastric bypass (74%), gastric banding (10%), sleeve gastrectomy (1%) or another procedure that included 1 percent of patients (Afterburn et al. 2015).

Gastric bypass is the most common of the three procedures in which the stomach is divided into a small upper section and larger bottom section. The small intestine is then rerouted to the small upper area, assuming the patient will eat less food. Gastric banding deals with the placement of an inflatable band around the top portion of the stomach, creating a much smaller stomach, while sleeve gastrectomy involves the removal of around 80 percent of the stomach (Whiteman 2015).

When the 14-year study ended, there were 263 deaths in the surgical group (average follow-up, 6.9 years) and 1,277 deaths in the matched control group (average follow-up, 6.6 years). The deaths rates estimated by Kaplan-Meier were 2.4% after 1 year, 6.4% at 5 years, and 13.8% after 10 years for patients who underwent surgery; for match control individuals, 1.7% after 1 year, 10.4% for 5 years, and 23.9 percent at 10 years (Afterburn et al. 2015). As you can see, patients who underwent weight loss surgery between 5 to 10 years had significantly lower mortality rates.

I truly understand how difficult it is for morbidly obese individuals to lose weight and having weight loss surgery is an option to consider with you doctor. Diet and exercise is important for any healthy lifestyle change and a recent study shows that diet pills or weight loss supplements rarely work. The results from this study show the beneficial relation between surgery and survival that has been demonstrated in younger, female populations.

Leeman Taylor
Senior Criminal Justice Major at Florida A&M University
Real Estate Investor & Internet Marketer

Source: Afterburn DE, Olsen MK, Smith VA, et al. “Association Between Bariatric Surgery and Long-term Survival” 6 January 2015. JAMA 2015

Girl Loses 50 Pounds After Weight Loss Surgery

Alexis was morbidly obese by the age of 12 but denied weight loss surgery by her health insurance company to stop the rare condition. Can you imagine that, being denied health care coverage for a serious health condition just because of your age? I understand weight loss surgery may be a risk factor for young children but if the benefits outweigh the odds then why not go for it? Since Alexis first told her story, donations have been pouring in for a gastric-sleeve procedure to help her lose weight (Shapiro 2014).

Alexis - Weight Loss Surgery

Hope and love for Alexis
I know it’s been a little while since I have updated. It’s been very busy with Alexis’ birthday coming up and Christmas. Alexis has been doing really good. She still doesn’t like going to school and gives me a hard time sometimes but she tries her best. She gets very very tired from school. She likes math, reading, and language arts. She doesn’t like music, or computers. She likes learning! She walks about a half mile or more every day at school. She is still scared to try new things that she couldn’t do while she was much heavier, but we are trying. Thank you everyone for caring! Oh yes and she got glasses!
December 7

About 3 years ago, Alexis had surgery to remove a benign brain tumor. Unfortunately, the surgery caused her hormones and metabolism to go chaos, increasing her appetite to make her feel hungry all the time. She continued to eat despite her family’s efforts to stop her and eventually gained more than 200 pounds – a rare, medically triggered obesity. Her health also decreased very fast (Shapiro 20014). Her last hope was to undergo a gastric-sleeve procedure to save her health and help her lose weight effectively.

The operation was performed in March at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center and the operation reduced her stomach size to help curb her appetite. Although the surgery was successful, Alexis still had to endure the agony of recovery but she pulled through very well with the strong support of family and loved ones. Jenny says they have enjoyed so much support and the comments from Facebook shows people really do care about Alexis.

By late June, she had lost 37 pounds and was off to a good start of becoming a new, healthier person (Shapiro 2014). She became a happier person and was back in school for the first time in nearly two years. She had more confidence and became the old, joyful Alexis she was once before. “Hope has been the only thing that has gotten us through,” said Jenny Shapiro, the mother of Alexis. Jenny says that her daughter’s strength and determination have made her even more proud of Alexis and she’s glad she helped her fight all the way.

Leeman Taylor
Senior Criminal Justice Major at Florida A&M University
Real Estate Investor & Internet Marketer

Source: Shapiro, J. “Once obese but starving Texas girl sees a healthy future months after surgery” 11 December 2014 www.today.com