Tag Archives: weight-loss surgery

Weight-Loss Surgery Reduces Death Risk for Diabetics

Weight-loss surgery can help with more than just losing weight for those who are obese and have type 2 diabetes. What if weight-loss surgery reduces death risks?

Weight-loss surgery Photo by 123rf
Weight-loss surgery Photo by 123rf

According to a new study, it also reduces premature death and heart complications by approximately 40 percent, compared to other medical treatments.

Weight-Loss Surgery Reduces Death Risk

Between 1998 and 2017, researchers compared the effects of weight-loss surgery and other medical care for people with type 2 diabetes. They looked at different issues such as heart failure, stroke and heart disease. The study author said there was a reduction in all of the components and the results were described as “striking”.

After an eight-year follow-up, individuals who had weight-loss surgery had:

  • 41% lower odds of dying from any cause,
  • 62% lower odds of heart failure,
  • 31% lower odds of heart disease,
  • 33% lower odds of stroke,
  • 60% lower odds of diabetic kidney disease,
  • 22% lower odds of atrial fibrillation.

Also, those who had surgery lost more weight and used fewer medications for diabetes and other conditions.

Weight-Loss Surgery Is Not A Replacement

Even though these are good results, I still do not think weight-loss surgery should be replaced with traditional diet and exercise. Weight loss surgery does have risks involved and it is not for everyone. If you are obese and really want to consider weight-loss surgery, please talk to your doctor to see if it is right for you.

Weight Loss Surgery May Be For You

There are new medications now that treat type 2 diabetes that were not available for the study, so people may have better outcomes in the current times. If you have tried everything else and still can’t achieve the weight loss you need, then having weight-loss surgery may be your only option.

Source: Gordong. S “Weight-Loss Surgery Drops Death Risk for Diabetics” www.webmd.com September 3, 2019

Weight-Loss Surgery Increases Alcohol Deaths

Weight-loss surgery has it pros and cons, but drug and alcohol deaths can increase, according to a new study.

Gastric Bypass Surgery
Gastric Bypass Surgery Photo by 123rf

To begin with, people who have a gastric bypass procedure done are three times more likely to die of drug or alcohol related death than the general population, according to researchers at the University of Pittsburgh.

Although the reason is not transparent, studies have shown that this procedure changes the way the body reacts to alcohol and drugs, however.

The Effect is Physiological

“The effect is purely physiological, not psychological,” said Dr. John Morton, chief of bariatric and minimally invasive surgery at Yale School of Medicine. “Gastric bypass surgery removes 95% of the stomach. Alcohol receptors exist in the stomach and the liver, so by removing so much of the stomach, people lose the first pass at metabolizing alcohol.”

During this study, 2,500 patients who had weight-loss surgery was follow for seven years. Eighty percent were women and 86% were also white. Ten of the patients died from alcohol or drug abuse during that time. All 10 had gastric bypass surgery, which shortens the intestine and reduces the stomach.

Smaller Stomach Means Weight Loss

However, having a smaller stomach make you feel fuller faster, thus helps you lose weight.

Researchers used a formula called “person years” to compare patient death rates with those in general population. There were about 90 deaths per 100,000 person years compared to 30 per 100,000 in the general population.

Furthermore, I can understand how any weight-loss surgery such as gastric bypass makes substance abuse dangerous. It is because most of the stomach is removed. The stomach helps to absorb such substances like drugs or alcohol so this can cause serious health damage.

Patients Should Be Aware of Weight-Loss Surgery

Finally, doctors should make patients aware of these findings because it would help them make the best decisions when it comes to weight-loss surgery.

Source: Wendy King, Ph.D., associate professor of epidemiology, University of Pittsburgh; John Morton, M.D., vice chair for quality, department of surgery, and division chief of bariatric and minimally invasive surgery, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Conn.; June 7, 2019,Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases, online

Leeman Taylor
B.S. Criminal Justice
Real Estate Investor

Weight-Loss Surgery Means Diabetes Remission

Nearly 70 percent of people with type 2 diabetes can accomplish long-term disease remission by having weight-loss surgery called gastric bypass, according to new Danish study.

Gastric Bypass Surgery for Weight Loss
Gastric Bypass Surgery Photo by
methodisthealthsystem.org

Although this may be good news for obese or overweight individuals seeking to lose weight, the surgery is not a cure for type 2 diabetes.  People can relapse and start having symptoms again even after they go into remission and seem to no longer have the disease. In fact, 27 percent patients had relapsed after a five-year follow-up.

Benefits of Gastric Bypass

One good thing about the gastric bypass surgery is that is what linked to reductions in nerve damage, vision problems and kidney disease.

Proven Weight Loss Surgeries

Gastric bypass and gastric sleeve surgery are two proven weight-loss surgeries that have helped many patients with weight loss and health issues such as type 2 diabetes. This is mainly because of the fat loss and calorie restriction according to the study lead author Dr. Lene Ring Madsen, from Aarhus University Hospital in Denmark.

The study had over 1,100 people who had gastric bypass in Denmark. The surgeries were between 2006 and 2015.

Patients were compared to those who had surgery to about 1,100 type 2 diabetics who did not. About 65 percent of the patients when into remission in six months while 74 percent had remission after a year.

I believe the most important findings in this study is the reduction of diabetes complications by 50 percent. People are afraid of going blind and amputations so if gastric bypass can reduce those chances, I say doctors and patients should consider this for better health and weight loss.

SOURCES: Lene Ring Madsen, M.D., Ph.D., Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark; Mitchell Roslin, M.D., director, bariatric surgery, Northern Westchester Hospital, Mount Kisco, N.Y.; Feb. 6, 2019,Diabetologia

Leeman Taylor
B.S. Criminal Justice
Real Estate Investor